• Fresh Views

    Reflections on our #WDD2018 Twitter Chat

    On Wednesday, November 14, 2018, World Diabetes Day, @AFreshPOVforYou was honored to moderate the 7:00 pm ET hour of the #WDD2018 Twitter Chat for #DSMA. Thank you to Cherise Shockley for allowing us to engage with the DOC on such an important evening.The questions put before participants were thoughtfully planned so that the information gained could be used in a small research study. In the near future, we look forward to sharing some of our learnings.

    We were thrilled with the participation and the depth of the responses to our “miracle question” exercise (See our previous blog posts to learn about “the miracle  question” and a bit about Solution Focused Brief Therapy [SFBT])

    There were 32 participants who created 358 Tweets and generated 1.54 million impressions! Wow!  If you’re familiar with Twitter Chats, search the #DSMA hashtag for all of posts between 7:00 pm ET and 8:00 pm ET on November 14, 2018 to follow the conversation.

    An overarching goal of the Twitter Chat was to explore the perceptions of the diabetes online community (or DOC for short)  on the miracle question approach to strengthen resilience and confidence needed to manage diabetes. As usual, the DOC is incredibly insightful and we learned so much.

    Here’s a sneak peak at the many thoughts shared during our discussion.

    We look forward to moderating a future #DSMA Twitter Chat in 2019 as we delve deeper into incorporating SFBT in diabetes care and education. Stay tuned!

  • Fresh Views

    Barcelona Bound: Look ahead to EASD 2019

    Basílica de la Sagrada Família, Barcelona, Spain

    A Fresh POV for You is excited to head out to Barcelona, Spain, one of our most favorite cities in the world! We are honored to be presenting an oral podium presentation at the 55th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD)

    Tami was last in Barcelona at this same conference six years ago, and not only learned a lot about diabetes prevention and management, but fell in love with the one-of-a-kind work of genius Spanish architect Antoni Gaudi throughout the city! You see one of the Gaudi houses above that Tami snapped. And below is his main work, the towering Basílica de la Sagrada Família, still under construction more than 135 years after the laying of the cornerstone. This  picture was from six years ago. This trip, Deb will be taking a walking tour of La Sagrada Familia with Take Walks,  a great way to get some physical activity in while doing some sightseeing. Looking forward to seeing the progress as construction continues. It is expected to be completed in 2026. 

    This annual Meeting of EASD is held in a different European city each year. It draws more than 15,000 delegates from over 130 countries and includes around 1,200 talks and presentations on the latest results in diabetes research by leading experts in the field. This meeting is highly scientific, and a majority of the oral sessions and posters focus on new diabetes treatments, understanding diabetes complications, and the physiology of diabetes care and prevention.

    A Fresh POV for You presents

    This year 2,003 abstracts were submitted – ours was one of the 1195 accepted for inclusion. Of all those sessions, there is only one oral symposium addressing the psychological side of living with and managing diabetes. That happens to be our session! Friday, 11:00-12:00 PM, in Ochoa Hall,  Integrating psychology into diabetes care. There are four research sessions in this symposium.If you plan to attend this conference, we invite you to join our presentation.

    We will be sharing findings from our research on “Perceptions of life with diabetes revealed through a solution-focused brief therapy exercise via Twitter”. Many of our readers participated in this Twitter Chat and provided important and insightful perspectives that led to the fascinating findings we will present. 

    Five sessions of interest

    A new diabetes questionnaire to add patients’ perspectives to diabetes care: a nationwide cross-sectional study among adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes M. Svedbo Engström, J. Leksell, U.-B. Johansson, S. Borg, B. Palaszewski, S. Franzén, S. Gudbjörnsdottir, K. Eeg-Olofsson, Sweden 

    This presentation will discuss the research completed to validate a new self-rated diabetes questionnaire (NDR-PROM).  Their data confirms that these questions add patients’ perspectives of living with diabetes and support experienced from diabetes care.

    Association of personality traits with continuous glucose measurement parameters in type 1 diabetes adults treated with personal insulin pumps T. Klupa, B. Matejko, M. Flakus, S. Mrozińska, Ł. Tota, M. Morawska, B. Kieć-Wilk, M. Malecki, Poland 

    This session sounds very interesting. The authors looked at the relationship between the Big Five personality traits and treatment outcomes in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Ultimately, these traits can help tailor diabetes management to individuals.  At A Fresh POV for you we are all about tailoring treatment and focusing on the unique strengths of the individual.

    Perceptions of life with diabetes revealed through a solution focused brief therapy exercise via Twitter D.A. Greenwood, T. Ross, E. Reifsnider, USA 

    During our session we will share the findings from our Twitter study.  We implemented the Miracle Question (MQ) approach, one tool in the Solution Focused Therapy tool-kit, to enhance resilience and confidence to manage diabetes.  We will expand upon the five themes that emerged from the data in response to the MQ and the desired future state including: more of living life; laughter and humor; self-compassion; resilience; and support. 

    Ketoacidosis hospitalisations among people with type 1 diabetes are associated with increased risks of rehospitalisation for suicide attempt J. Petit, K. Goueslard, J.-C. Chauvet-Gelinier, B. Bouillet, B. Vergès, C. Quantin, France  

    This presentation will share results from a study that identified that people with a past history of being hospitalized for ketoacidosis or hyperglycemic coma have a higher risk of being re-hospitalized for suicide attempt within 7 years. The risk increases with more hospitalizations. This is new information for us, and seems incredibly important to share.

    The EASD/ADA Symposium: Digital apps for diabetes treatment and prevention: opportunities and challenges  If you follow us, you know that we are very interested in the use of technology to improve diabetes care. We look forward to attending this session on Wednesday evening at 5:30 pm and hope it will address using a strengths-based, empowering approach to reviewing diabetes data. 

    A poster session of interest 

    D-PS 064 Psychological aspects of diabetes With posters that range from addressing anxiety and depression in diabetes, to eating disorders and fear of hypoglycemia, 

    Our goal

    Our goal, as we present at conferences this coming year, is to bring attention to the concepts of solution-focused brief therapy and coaching. To focus on “exceptions” (those times the problem could have happened but some how did not) or situations that are going well, instead of always focusing on the problems that need to be fixed. If we spend our time using a strengths based approach we can envision possibilities and opportunities to help people move forward towards their unique vision of their future. 

    After the conference we’ll be sharing more learnings with you!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, we invite you to subscribe to our blog, and we will send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

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    Disclaimer: A Fresh POV for You is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

  • Fresh Views

    European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD)…here we come!

    Dreams don’t work unless you take action. The surest way to make your dreams come true is to live them. ― Roy T. Bennett


    From a peak overlooking the harbor in Monaco


    The last couple of weeks have taken us on the road for work, followed by a few days of relaxation with friends while taking in the astoundingly beautiful French Riviera. Throughout our travels we explored many historic sites, hundreds of years old, nestled high up on peaks among bustling cities below.

    Historic fortress in Cannes, France

    We explored countless peaks and valleys. In fact, our home for the week was nestled in the valley below the ancient village of Eze, France.

    Valley below Eze Village, France

    Red rock mountains by the sea near Saint-Raphael, France

    In our recent blog Peaks and Valleys in Life, we discussed that peaks and valleys are catalysts for positive change, both in life with diabetes and life in general. And on that note, we have some sensational news to share with you – a definite “peak” we experienced while on our travels!  We received notification that an abstract we submitted to the 55th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) has been accepted for an oral podium presentation! This Annual Meeting, held in a different European city each year, draws more than 15,000 delegates from over 130 countries and includes more than 1,200 talks and presentations on the latest results in diabetes research by leading experts in the field. We will be presenting the findings from our research on “Perceptions of life with diabetes revealed through a solution-focused brief therapy exercise via Twitter”. If you plan to attend this conference, we invite you to join us at our presentation. More information to come.

    Many of our readers participated in this Twitter Chat and provided important and insightful perspectives that led to the fascinating findings we will present. Here is a sneak peek that we shared a few months back, Let’s Learn from the DOC!  Our goal, as we present at conferences this coming year, is to bring attention to the concepts of solution focused brief therapy and coaching.  To focus on “exceptions” or situations that are going well, instead of always focusing on the problems that need to be fixed. If we spend our time using a strengths based approach we can envision possibilities and opportunities to help people move forward towards their unique vision of their future.

    We made it back from France just in time for the start of the American Diabetes Association’s Scientific Sessions meeting. Stop back by over the next couple of weeks as we focus on some of the highlights from that meeting.

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  • Fresh Views

    Co-design: How we are engaging people living with diabetes in designing diabetes education services


    A new day dawning

    Please, let patients help improve healthcare. Let patients help steer our decisions, strategic and practical. Let patients help define what value in medicine is. –Dave deBronkart, Let Patients Help

    Imagine with us…… a square table. On one side sits the healthcare team. On the other sits their patient living with diabetes. The healthcare team has created a plan and program of great things for their patient that they think their patient needs…without once asking for any input or perspective of that patient – the one who actually lives with diabetes 24/7/365. What if instead, at that same table, everyone is sitting on the same side. The individual living with diabetes was included in the discussion and decision making from the very beginning. The plan and program was crafted around their input. That’s an illustration of co-design. And that is something we strongly believe in. What if relatable individualized solution-focused education services for people with diabetes were co-designed with people living with diabetes?

    What exactly is co-design?

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement defines co-design in the following way: “Co-design involves the patients in the design process and works with them to understand their met and unmet needs…..This enables us to incorporate the patient perspective directly and immediately.”   In theory it doesn’t sound complicated, but it doesn’t seem to happen very often. The healthcare profession has a long history of the clinician being the “expert” and the patient being the one to “follow orders”. Often, programs and services are designed by the medical staff, independent of patient input. Some more evolved health systems are adding patient and family advisory councils to get feedback and input. However well meaning, they’re often not facilitated to the full potential.With co-design, everyone has an equal say in creating the solution. It is not spending time just getting feedback about programs you’ve already designed….it’s about including people in the decisions from the very beginning.  

    So instead of the healthcare team solving problems they think exist, co-design allows a multi-stakeholder team to first identify the problem that really exists and then develop solutions together. People living with diabetes know what’s worked for them and what hasn’t, and how they would create a program if they had the chance. This is truly a person centered approach to care.

    How has @AFreshPOVforYou been engaged in co-design?

    Supported by a three-year PCORI award, the Intercultural Diabetes Online Community Research Council, affectionately known as, iDOCr, was born (which Deb is a part of). The goal of PCORI is to help patients make more informed healthcare decisions by supporting research that compares the effectiveness of existing, known and proven treatments. All PCORI projects involve patients from the very beginning of every research study or community engagement project. With the iDOCr funding, a stakeholder group was created that represented researchers, clinicians, people working in industry, non-profit organizations and people affected by diabetes (people living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and caregivers). Both English and Spanish-speaking individuals were included.Together, over the three-year award, this team developed a research question that was important to the group with the goal of eventually receiving funding to conduct the study. One of the main outcomes of this award was very interesting to us….although the majority of the iDOCr patient representatives lived with type 1 diabetes, the team decided to develop a research study focused on type 2 diabetes in the Hispanic community, because that is where they saw the need. This is the essence of co-design; preconceived ideas might have encouraged a completely different research question. The team is about to embark on the research study very soon, so stay tuned for more information. You can learn more about iDOCr via Facebook, Twitter and read the Blogs here.

    We also led the development of two videos to educate about the use of person first language in diabetes.  These 2 videos “Why Language Matters” and “Changing the Conversation” were written and produced using co-design principles. The background and supporting information was first taken from the 2017 paper, The Use of Language in Diabetes Care and Education jointly published by AADE and the ADA. We wanted to understand how language has directly impacted people living with diabetes by learning about real world experiences. We also wanted to learn from healthcare providers how they used empowering, person first language in their practices. So, we developed questions and asked the diabetes community to answer them. We were so overwhelmed with responses that we knew people really wanted to share their stories about why #LanguageMatters to them. From these stories we crafted the scripts for the two films and then we sent the scripts back out to the diabetes community to make sure we got it right. Finally, the videos were filmed with those same individuals, not actors, but people living in the diabetes community. The amazing, talented and Telly award winning creative director from Mytonomy, Mr. Kevin Kuchar created videos that we are so proud of and really reflect the true emotion that language can create and why the language we use in healthcare has a direct impact on outcomes and well being. Read our November, 2018 blog Language can change your POV!

    How are we using co-design now?

    Currently, we are using co-design to help us create diabetes services that resonate with people living with diabetes. Our efforts began with a #DSMA Twitter Chat with the diabetes online community. Questions for the group focused around how diabetes education could bring them joy (read our blog to learn about this discussion). From this information we developed a survey to dive deeper and learn more. One finding from the survey was that most people with diabetes are not familiar with the concept of co-design, which told us that it’s not happening much in the healthcare space where diabetes is being managed. We’d like to change this practice and share with others how its done!  Our next step is to hold a focus group. Each step along the way, we are learning new things.

    We’ll be excited to share out focus group outcomes and learnings later this year. Stay tuned!

    As e-patient Dave said, we want to “let patients help” us move diabetes education services forward in partnership with the real experts, those living with diabetes 24/7/365.

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  • Fresh Views

    Finding joy: In life and through diabetes education services



    Tami and Deb “finding joy” in Glencoe, Scotland a couple of years ago

    Joy is strength. – Mother Teresa

    Today is the 1st day of spring! The sun, warmer weather, and flowers in bloom definitely sparks joy for us. On the topic of “sparking joy”, @AFreshPOVforYOU had the opportunity to moderate the #DSMA Twitter Chat last Wednesday 3/13/19. We had a great discussion that delved into finding joy in life, as well as in diabetes education. (We’d like to hear your thoughts too! If you’re willing to share, click the link to a survey here or at the end of this blog).

    This topic of sparking or finding joy, was inspired by @MarieKondo and her Netflix show about her KonMari method. Are you familiar with her and her wildly popular method of organizing, the KonMari method? Basically, it consists of gathering together one’s belongings, one category at a time, and then keeping only those things that “spark joy”. If they don’t spark joy, then you thank them, and let go of them. (The KonMari method also inspired us to get an early start on spring cleaning!)  Maybe you’re not into organizing, that’s okay. But this concept of what sparks joy…it got us thinking about how we could apply it to diabetes and explore how diabetes education may spark joy.

    During the chat, conversation began with what sparks joy for people in their own life, and then turned to when engaging with the diabetes online community (DOC). We asked participants to summarize in one word their experience with the DOC. Here are some of the words people shared: unifying, heartening,  inspiring, awesome, knowledge, enlightening, meaningful, village and yes, joyful!  

    So how can those same words be used to describe engaging diabetes education services?

    We discussed the concept of co-design and wanted to learn if people with diabetes designed a diabetes education program or service, what would they include and how would they design it?  And ideally, what would spark joy for them when participating in a service or program? We heard some really interesting ideas that resonated with the solutions focused approach we are incorporating in our services.  

    Here are some of the thoughts and suggestions:

    • Diabetes is more about the person, than the numbers and gadgets!
    • Experienced people with diabetes (PWD)  teaching newbies
    • Personalized, person centered, there is no “right way” or “one way” to do anything.  Let people choose from a variety of options.
    • Several mentioned meeting people where they are, focusing on strengths, and not worrying about getting “straight A’s”, but realizing everyone is unique
    • Use of technology
    • Self-advocacy
    • Focus on emotional health and goal setting
    • PWD telling their stories
    • Stronger connection to others with diabetes, Interacting with others who have diabetes
    • Be community-based
    • Incorporate personality questions
    • We were really inspired by the amazing @KellyRawlings who thought that “joy” should be one of the AADE7 self-care behaviors for managing diabetes!

    We observed an overwhelming commonality of people wanting or needing to connect more with other PWD as they are learning about living with diabetes. As we closed out the chat, we challenged participants to do something every day that sparks joy in life!  So today, that is our challenge to you too. Do something for yourself, or for others that sparks joy! And if it helps you, track your experiences and feelings in a gratitude journal.

    Thank you to @DiabetesSocMed and Cherise for allowing us to moderate the chat and engage in a fast and fun chat, it really sparked joy for us!

    Would you like to help us learn more about what would make an ideal diabetes education experience?

    At A Fresh POV for you, our goal is to co-design innovative diabetes education services. If you or someone you know has type 2 diabetes or prediabetes and would be interested in participating in a focus group about co-designing education, please complete this survey which will take less than 5 minutes.

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  • Fresh Views

    Being human first: Perspectives around optimizing healthcare interactions


    Tami and Deb enjoying fresh views in Chicago, finding freedom and joy in life.
    T

    Of course different people fulfill different functions in this world. It cannot be otherwise. As far as intellectual or physical abilities are concerned – knowledge, skills, talents, and energy levels – human beings differ widely. What really matters is not what function you fulfill in this world, but whether you identify with your function to such an extent that it takes you over and becomes a role that you play. When you play roles, you are unconscious.“   – Eckhart Tolle

    Deb’s been listening to an Oprah’s Book Club book on Audible, Eckhart Tolle A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose. While Deb has found the book deep, and a challenging “read”, she’s found that it creates an opportunity to take an introspective look at the way we engage in the world. Tolle believes everyone can find “the freedom and joy of life” if they live in the present moment.

    Deb has also been listening to Oprah’s weekly Super Soul Conversations Podcast to review each chapter of the book, typically while taking her daily walk (and it’s helping a lot to understand and internalize the concepts). During a recent podcast there was discussion between Oprah and Tolle about roles people play and how roles inhibit thinking.  In applying some of Tolle’s principles to our mission and vision here @AFreshPOVforYOU, there was an “a ha” moment for Deb around how the #languagematters movement in healthcare needs to expand to include not just the words we use, but also how we implement person first language. (check out our November blog on why language matters here)  To really put the person (not the “patient”) first, there needs to be a “person” on both sides of the interaction for true person centered care.

    One section of Oprah’s weekly podcast addressed healthcare and how when a healthcare professional “plays the role of healthcare professional”, he or she may become “unconscious” of the fact he or she is a human person while embracing their “healthcare role”. And, that the “patient” across from them is also a person. Something vital is then missing. And as a result, the person (“patient) may end up feeling disconnected and dismissed.

    The discussion brought to mind a recent #DSMA Twitter chat that @AFreshPOVforYou joined a couple of weeks ago. One question asked during the chat was: “How can healthcare practitioners facilitate more empowering or effective communication with patients or vise versa?”  One enlightened participant, the incredible behavioral and data scientist Dr. Chandra Osborn replied, “Be a human first – a practitioner second.”  

    Her reply really struck a chord, and aligns with the closing words in Tolle’s quote above, “When you play roles, you are unconscious.“ Let’s repeat that…..”When you play roles, you are unconscious”. How can there be empowering or effective communication if people are not “present” and if they are “unconscious”?

    Along those lines, We @AFreshPOVforYOU have experienced this first hand.

    Deb’s experience…

    Deb recalls a visit with her daughter to the pediatrician where they never once made eye contact. The doctor typed on the computer the whole time, asking impersonal questions and fulfilling her role. They did not feel like they were part of the conversation.

    Tami’s experience…

    Tami remembers a similar scenario while sitting alongside her mom at hospital discharge following her mom’s knee surgery. The healthcare team was talking all “around” both of them, talking to each other, asking questions, giving a multitude of instructions, rarely looking at them or expressing interest in their point of view or concerns. They did not feel like they were part of the conversation either.

    We’ve heard many similar stories from people with diabetes – how at times the relationship with their healthcare provider was not ideal. Some have stated they cancelled an appointment because they didn’t want to be scolded for an A1C value that was higher than expected. Or because their weight was up a few pounds.

    In traditional healthcare people with diabetes are expected to play the role of patient and clinicians play the role of doctor, nurse, dietitian etc.  Yet this type of engagement does not promote healthy communications and relationships. As Tolle recounts, “Authentic human interactions become impossible when you lose yourself in a role.”

    We’ve experienced being on both sides of this equation.  As diabetes educators, we are always striving to improve, but we are not perfect. We’ve made our share of mistakes, but we’ve grown and learned from them. Deb recalls one client she saw years ago that was very frustrated with her because she was following the “assigned content” for the appointment per the prescribed healthcare provider orders, and at the end of the visit the client said, “we didn’t have time for any of my questions!”  That meeting really left an impact on her, she was playing the “role” of a diabetes educator and she never made that mistake again. Fast forward to a more recent experience when she received a call from a healthcare provider who referred his patient to her.  The doctor said, “I’m not quite sure what you did, but Mr. Jones is never satisfied with anything  or anyone, but he could not stop talking about how his appointment with you was the best diabetes visit he’s ever had.”  You know what she did? She started by asking him about his family and recent vacation, and then asked what was going well with his diabetes management?  She was being a human first and he was treated like a person.

    If you follow our blog, you know that we are advocates of solution focused therapy. In the context of solution focused therapy, the client/person with diabetes is viewed as the expert and the most important element is the “therapeutic alliance” between the client and the practitioner.  The relationship is the key to being able to work together. And to build a relationship it requires being present, being conscious of one’s own behaviors, use of language, and body language which all tell a story. We believe it’s critical to enter healthcare exchanges as a human first- not playing a role – with each party recognizing their part in the conversation/interaction as valuable.

    Our goal, through incorporating principles of solutions focused therapy and coaching in diabetes care and education, is to change the conversation, the interaction and the experience of the diabetes community to improve health.  As Eckhart Tolle says, we need to “become conscious of being conscious.”  We need to work as a team, be present in all of our interactions and most of all be human.

    In closing, we leave you with a few thoughts on what you can do when you engage in a healthcare interaction.

    If you are a healthcare provider:

    1. Be human first
    2. Check your ego at the door
    3. Appreciate that the person in front of you is as an expert on their condition
    4. Listen carefully before speaking
    5. When possible, sit on the same side of the table
    6. Understand the burden associated with living with a chronic condition

    If you are a person living with a chronic condition:

    1. Be human first
    2. Actively participate in your medical appointments and your self-management to the best of your ability
    3. Work in partnership with your care team
    4. Be honest about your capabilities

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  • Fresh Views

    Let’s learn from the Diabetes Online Community (or the DOC for short)!

    We are big believers in “collective wisdom”, or rather the ability to learn from a greater community.  When sharing thoughts and experiences we can learn from others. Would you agree? As we are delving into the use of Solutions Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) in diabetes we want to engage the DOC in a Twitter chat so we can learn first-hand from those living with diabetes every day!

    One practice used in SFBT is called the “miracle question.” This method helps people use the resources they already have and leverage “exceptions”. Exceptions are simply times when life works better, or times when problems are less likely to take over.  Focusing on personal “exceptions” means focusing focus on situations that went well in the past, or on positive things learned from past experiences (things maybe even forgotten about). Managing diabetes is challenging. Constant focus on “problems” can eroded confidence. We hear that repeatedly from clients we engage with. By  instead focusing on abilities and the possibilities, there are solutions ready to use right in front of us. We can envision the future differently.

    So, here is the miracle question:Suppose tonight while you sleep, a miracle happens. When you wake tomorrow morning, what will you see yourself doing, thinking, or believing, about yourself that will tell you a miracle has happened in your life?”  We challenge you to think about it. How would you answer it?

    By focusing on “exceptions”, goals become different. Focus turns to what is desired in our life instead of what “won’t happen” anymore. To modify this question for diabetes management, let’s consider the following:  If you could fast-forward to a time where you feel satisfied with your diabetes management, what will be different in your life that will let you know things are better?

    Weigh in with your thoughts to these questions and others on Wednesday, November 14, 2018, World Diabetes Day, as we moderate the 7:00 pm ET hour of the #WDD2018 for #DSMA.  During the chat we will be walking through a modified miracle question exercise to learn from all of you. We have received IRB approval to use the de-identified Twitter Chat data (that means we remove the Twitter handles before we review the data) for a qualitative research study to explore the perceptions of the DOC on incorporating the miracle question approach to strengthen resilience and confidence needed to manage diabetes. (And for those of you that may not be familiar with IRB approval, that just means a review committee applies research   ethics by reviewing the proposed research methods to ensure they are ethical). Don’t worry, if you want to participate in the chat, but prefer for us to not use your answers in our research study, you can do that too. We’ll ask who wants to not be included during the chat and will remove your answers.

    Please join in the discussion and let’s learn if this approach resonates with you!

    If you’d like to read more about the Miracle Question, we loved this book!

    Disclaimer: A Fresh POV for You is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

     

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