• Fresh Views

    30 Moments of Joy

    Glencoe, Scotland

    Joy does not simply happen to us. We have to choose joy and keep choosing it every day.

    ~Henri J.M. Nouwen

    Joy can be really big crazy happiness, or it can be a tiny spot of light in the darkness. The thing is, you have to be able to realize and register joy. Joy is in the moment. Read our past blog on finding Joy here.

    30 Moments of Joy Challenge

    Each day for 1 month identify 1 moment that brings you light and joy…it can be the tiniest thing and quickest moment. For example, here’s a  few we’ve experienced over the last month: 

    • seeing sparkling snow dusted roofs on the drive to work
    • seeing a picture from our past travels to Scotland pop up in my social media memories (see above)
    • hearing a favorite song play on the radio
    • kitty purring in my ear
    • catching up with highschool friends over coffee
    • A beautiful whimsical handmade birthday card 
    • the view of the mountains covered in snow
    Deb’s favorite place to walk on the weekends when home is Folsom Lake. She finds joy when she views the mountains from Tahoe.

    Above mentioned birthday card!

    Deb’s cat Nike bringing her joy every day.

    Thinking back on favorite joyful moments can trigger some of that same joyful energy. In this new year, practice Intentionality on recognizing and acknowledging those moments – staying as present as possible in the moment (even when the moment may stink) to not miss out on these moments. Are you taking in your surroundings? Are you really listening to your friend? Are you tasting the steaming cup of coffee?

    What steps can you take today to increase your chances of experiencing joy?

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    2024: Do more of what’s already working

    Do more of what’s already working for you. – Salil Jha

    Thanks for reading, whether you are new to our blog or have been following us over the last 5 years (yes 5 years!). We are solution-focused diabetes care and education specialists who are passionate about doing diabetes care and education differently. Too much of life is spent focusing on problems. Instead, we believe in turning attention to possibilities, opportunities, and a fresh vision for the future. We see the benefit in stepping alongside our clients as “think partners” to focus on what’s important to them, what’s already going well, and build upon that to reach their goals so that they may live life to the fullest. We invite you to join us in doing the same!

    Our Goal in 2024

    Our goal this year is to provide more fresh points of view to guide and support healthcare professionals in implementing a solution-focused approach to practice so clients can embrace possibilities, opportunities, and a fresh vision for the future. 

    New Year’s Solutions (Instead of Resolutions)

    The beginning of a new year typically sparks the conversation around what am I going to do better or do differently this year…with many arriving at New Year’s Resolutions. New year’s resolutions often focus on  “stopping” doing certain things and starting to make changes. What if, instead of making New Year’s Resolutions – which require change and “fixing” problems  –  you focus instead on making New Year’s Solutions? One way to identify solutions is to focus on things that have gone well in the past, and pinpoint how you can do more of that (rather than trying to change). 

    Fill an empty jar

    To put this into practice throughout 2024, start the year with an empty jar.  Each week add a note to it with a good thing that happened…something that went well.  Whether you call it a message jar, happiness jar, or don’t call it anything at all, on next New Year’s Eve empty the jar and read about the amazing year you had. Not only does this simple practice allow you to identify and build upon things that are working in the present, at year’s end you can then reflect on how you can continue to do more of what works.

    So as we look with excitement to 2024, join us in making New Year’s Solutions and doing more of the things that you do well!

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    Cheers to the New Year!

    Cheers to 2024 from us here at A Fresh POV for You! We’re ringing in the new year and taking time to be mindful and express gratitude for all that 2023 brought. We’ll be back in a couple of weeks with more fresh points of view to guide and support healthcare professionals in implementing a solution-focused approach to practice so clients can embrace possibilities, opportunities, and a fresh vision for the future. In the meantime, see below a few things we each were grateful for in 2023.

    3 highlights Tami is expressing gratitude for from 2023:

    Exploring Michigan on a 10-day road trip with my husband & this sunset view of Lake Michigan

    Disco-themed Picnic with the Pops with friends – rocking our Disco accessories here!

    Farm fresh eggs from my son and daughter-in-law’s Prairie Bluebell Egger chickens

    3 highlights Deb is expressing gratitude for from 2023:

    Celebrating the wedding of my oldest son Michael and Elizabeth

    Combining a work trip to Germany with some fun traveling with my daughter, Diana.

    Celebrating an early 90th birthday with my mom!

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    May Your Holidays Be Merry and Bright!

    Wishing you a happy and healthy holiday season from us here at A Fresh POV for You!

    A stop at The Drake Hotel in Chicago – always beautiful during the holidays!

    We’re taking a few weeks off but will be back in the new year with more fresh points of view to guide and support healthcare professionals in implementing a solution-focused approach to practice so clients can embrace possibilities, opportunities, and a fresh vision for the future. 

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    Be REAL Series: L is for LISTENING

    In our personal lives, one of our favorite places to be still and listen is oceanside

    Be present in all things, and thankful for all things.

    ~ Maya Angelou

    Today we wrap up a 4-blog series called, “Be REAL”, revisiting 4 powerful words from our 2020 series on the power of words. Here are the 4 words that make-up the acronym REAL, today closing out with LISTENING.

    Today’s word in our Be REAL series  is LISTENING 

    The only way to listen is to be truly present and in the moment. Often, as healthcare professionals (HCPs)  we have our “agenda” or “very important information” that we feel needs to be addressed, discussed, and prioritized. However, our clients/patients goals and priorities may be different than ours. Sometimes the best course of action is to be quiet, and to listen. In that moment we are present in the encounter, we hear what people are saying, we can then address their most pressing concerns, fears and challenges. Granted, this can be a challenge for an HCP (ourselves included) with so much information that we want to impart. The reality is that when we have our agenda in our head and are planning our “presentation of facts” we are not present. 

    Check out our previous post on Listening and how it can transform interactions. Engaging in a solution-focused approach is not possible without enhanced listening skills. Our role is not to solve problems, but to help people understand their individual situations and identify solutions to help them move forward in their lives, goals etc. When we listen, we can help them to discern what works for them, and help them to see where they have strengths.

    As we challenged back in 2020, we challenge our readers to actively focus on listening before speaking with clients and ensure each encounter is focused on their concerns and what is important to them:

    1. Listen for clues and cues that highlight exceptions, current resources and strengths the client identifies. Maybe open the conversation with a simple question, such as, “What’s been going on in your world?” It’s broad, enables the client to take the conversation where they wish, and can provide insight into other aspects and impacts in their life.
    2. As the conversation evolves, use the clients own language to help the client envision their preferred future

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    Be REAL Series: A is for ACCEPTANCE

    Duke Kahanamoku statue at Duke’s restaurant, La Jolla, CA

    When there is Aloha in your heart, nothing is insurmountable.

    ~ Yoshio

    Today’s word in our Be REAL series  is Acceptance!

    When we started our series on solution-focused words back in 2020, Acceptance was our first post in the series. We believed, and still do, that acceptance is the key underpinning of everything in healthcare and in life. We wrote about both self-acceptance as well as healthcare professional (HCP) acceptance of what people living with diabetes are able to do. We all have different capacities and priorities, and we might not agree on what these are. Our role as an HCP is to understand and support people sharing their experiences with us and help them to live in acceptance of the decisions they make. Our goal is to support and not enforce.

    Why did we start our blog with an image of Duke Kahanamoku?  He was known as the Ambassador of Aloha. An Olympic swimmer and surfer from Hawaii who spread the spirit of Aloha and the acceptance that Aloha brings. Aloha means welcome, but also means love, peace, compassion and  fellowship. What a great way to embody acceptance?

    In today’s crazy world, acceptance can mean so many things. So we’d like to use Aloha as a simple way to think about how we accept ourselves and each other.

    In our original blog series we suggested weekly “challenges” to our readers.  Here we revisit our challenge from 2020 and add how we can position acceptance along with the spirit of Aloha.

    Here are 5 solution-focused questions you can incorporate to focus on building acceptance:

    1. Could  you tell me about your strengths and qualities you are happy about?
    2. What is one thing you have come to accept in your life that took some time to process?
    3. How did you feel when you were finally able to accept that challenging situation?
    4. How could you use those experiences and feelings to move you forward to accept a new challenge now?
    5. How can I help you come to realize acceptance in your life?

    As an additional challenge, we encourage you to accept the spirit of Aloha as you engage in your daily life,at work and at home, with people you know and with those you don’t. Be an example of accepting differences in the world with love, peace, compassion and fellowship.

    Join us next week as we focus on the L in Be REAL: Listening!

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    Be REAL Series: E is for EXPERTS

    “Don’t ever diminish the power of words. Words move hearts and hearts move limbs.”

    -Hamza Yusuf

    In our last post we began a 4-blog series called, “Be REAL”, revisiting some powerful words that can advance a solution-focused practice. The 4 words we’ll focus on make up the acronym REAL: 

    • Resilience
    • Experts
    • Acceptance and 
    • Listening 

    You can catch up on our last post on Resilience, the R in REAL on October 25, 2023.

    Today’s word is EXPERTS

    According to Dictionary.com, an “expert” is a person who has a special skill or knowledge in some particular field. 

    So in the world of diabetes care and education, a diabetes care and education specialist (DCES) may first come to mind as the “expert”. Yet, we challenge you to think beyond that. Have you heard the term “expert patient”? That refers to the inherent knowledge that individuals living with diabetes (or other chronic conditions) have about their condition, its impact on their life, and what decisions they feel comfortable making. People with diabetes (PWD) are the true experts in their lived experience with diabetes. 

    That said, just because one has a chronic condition does not imply that they have expertise in dealing with it. That presents the opportunity for the DCES to step alongside the PWD as a “think partner”. In a solution-focused interaction, the relationship between the healthcare provider and the patient/client is different. Instead of a hierarchical position, in solution-focused relationships, the DCES and the patient/client are considered “think partners”. They work together to identify solutions to move that individual forward towards achieving their goals. The DCES helps develop solutions by asking their patient/client questions and helping them to use their own personal strengths to create solutions that work for them.

    Be a think partner: 7 questions to try

    1. What do you know about yourself that lets you know you can achieve what you want?
    2. What would success look like for you (e.g. in life, in living with diabetes etc.)?
    3. What strengths do you have and use to help you manage your diabetes every day? 
    4. How can you use your strengths to create opportunities for success?
    5. What is one thing you have come to accept in your life that took some time to process?
    6. How did you feel when you were finally able to accept that challenging situation?
    7. How could you use those experiences and feelings to move you forward to accept a new challenge now?

    For more on EXPERTS, here is our first blog we wrote on EXPERTS back in 2020: Experts

    Join us next week as we focus on the A in Be REAL: Acceptance!

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    Be REAL Series: R is for RESILIENCE

    “If we understood the power of our thoughts, we would guard them more closely. If we understood the awesome power of our words, we would prefer silence to almost anything negative. In our thoughts and words, we create our own weaknesses and our own strengths. Our limitations and joys begin in our hearts. We can always replace negative with positive.” ~Betty Eadie

    Back in February 2020, just before we knew how the world was going to change through the pandemic, we launched a series on the power of words. Our goal was (and still is) to evolve solution-focused vocabulary among our readers to inspire, motivate and provide practical guidance to change messages so we can help people embrace possibilities, opportunities and create a vision for the future.

    Today we begin a 4-blog series called, “Be REAL”, revisiting some of those powerful words and our important messages. The 4 words we’ll focus on make up the acronym REAL: 

    • Resilience
    • Experts
    • Acceptance and 
    • Listening 

    Today’s word is RESILIENCE

    Resilience is one of the skills essential for people with diabetes to develop in order to live well with diabetes. And yes, resilience is a skill. Research shows that resilience is a skill that can be developed over time with practice and support. We think about resilience as the ability to “bounce back” after challenging times. It’s having inner strength when life throws you challenges and still being able to hold your head up.

    Living with a chronic condition like diabetes means living with chronic stress, and that can make managing diabetes more challenging. That’s where building resilience comes into play. Our last blog shared 5 ways to cultivate mental toughness, helping to build resilience.  

    When a diabetes care and education specialist engages in a solution-focused approach to practice, the ability to build resilience is not only possible, but highly likely. When we reinforce and recognize positive behaviors and strengths, people tend to do more of those things more often. In solution-focused practice we call these “exceptions” or times when problems don’t exist and life is working well. 

    People who see themselves as being resilient are typically those who have suffered adversity, faced significant challenges and were able to come out of their struggles stronger and with a different perspective on life. Often those who have faced the biggest challenges are the most resilient. Tami recalls a patient that she worked with over a several year time frame. This individual lived with long-standing diabetes, lost her husband at a young age, dealt with some significant health and financial challenges, and then lost everything she owned in a house fire. Despite the many life challenges she’d experienced, she had developed the ability to bounce back, persevere, and maintain focus on managing her diabetes. Life seemingly brought her a lot of “lemons”, so to speak. (We wrote about working through “when life gives you lemons” in our blog here)

    A key focus in building resilience is on recognizing stressors and building plans to work through the stressful situations and setbacks, and come out on the other side feeling successful, even if it is just one very small success.

    What’s REAL in 2023?

    Who knew how much resilience we would all need and how important our “VIPs” would be in life coming through the pandemic in the time since we wrote our original 2020 blog on resilience! If you didn’t catch it, you can find it here:  2020 Resilience blog.

    Please take a moment and Be REAL with us – share your impressions of resilience and what changes you’ve noticed in the past few years. How has resilience been important to you?

    Join us next week as we focus on the E in Be REAL: Experts!

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    You CAN Do It: 5 Ways to Cultivate Mental Toughness

    Oh, yes. The past can hurt. But the way I see it, you can either run from it…or learn from it.

    ~Rafiki from The Lion King

    A view Deb captured during a summer visit to Meteora, Greece

    The quote above from the movie The Lion King is a favorite of Tami’s, as she watched the movie a gazillion times with her son when he was growing up. For those of you Lion King fans, doesn’t the picture above look something like Pride Rock in the movie?  Actually this rock formation above is in Meteora, Greece (rather than Africa) and Deb captured this picture back in the summer. 

    So how can we learn from the past rather than run from it? What we term “mental toughness” definitely plays a role. You might think of mental toughness as determined, resolute or strong-willed. When we think about mental toughness, the Navy SEALS come to mind. They are fearless because of the training they go through. While in San Diego this time last year, Tami witnessed with fascination a group of SEALS training on one of the beaches. 

    Diabetes impacts mental and  psychological well-being. Just as the SEALS progressively build strength and mental toughness, so can individuals with diabetes train their mental toughness. 

     We like to think of mental toughness like a muscle – the more it’s exercised, the stronger it becomes. It’s been noted that threats to mental toughness include perfectionism, negative self-talk, self-doubt, and the inability to control emotions and fear. To help hold off those threats today we share 5 ways to cultivate mental toughness.

    5 ways to cultivate mental toughness

    1- Embrace a “progress not perfection” mindset. Learn from the past, not run from it. Learn  what worked and what didn’t. We wrote about adopting  the “progress, not perfection” mindset here. This mindset encourages focus on smaller achievements…instead of focusing solely on the end goal. It can help us lean into the realistic and practical, and  acknowledge, accept and enjoy things.. even if they aren’t perfect. Managing diabetes is not about being “perfect”. Life happens. But progress is the goal. For instance, progress toward achieving a healthy A1C or progress toward spending  more time in range.

    2- Use affirmations. Life with diabetes is without a doubt challenging on many levels. It’s critical to be good to yourself and keep self-talk positive. One way to to do that is through using affirmations. I will not worry. I have no need for fear.  Read more about the power of affirmations and some of our favorite most impactful affirmations in our blog here

    3- Practice mindfulness.  You may have seen the results of a meta-analysis published in Diabetic Medicine which showed that mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches to diabetes education may more effectively reduce A1C levels, anxiety, depression, and diabetes distress than education as usual. This impact was noted both immediately and up to 1-month post intervention. Mindfulness improves the ability to slow down and choose a response that works for you rather than to quickly react off the cuff. In helping your clients find what works for them, and build on that, mindfulness apps can be another tool in your solution-focused “tool box”. We shared some favorite mindfulness apps in our blog here

    4- Keep a journal. Sometimes the simple act of writing things down so we can see them allows us to consciously and unconsciously start working through them. We’ve shared some of our personal experiences with journaling and how it’s benefited us here and here. This can be a small step toward feeling in control, when things may otherwise feel out of control. 

    5- Embrace the power of “can do”. When faced with a challenging situation, rather than fearing it and running from it, approach it with a “can do” perspective. Reflect on the past. If you HAVE done it in the past, you KNOW you can do it, so you CAN do it again and you WILL do it. Find more reflections on “When life gives you lemons” in our blog here. Encourage clients to learn from the past. Think about and celebrate the successes (even small ones) they’ve had managing diabetes.  Recalling the good stuff  helps get through the tough times.

    Another point of view in Meteora, Greece

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

  • Fresh Views

    Feeling Out of Balance? 4 tips to help restore work-life balance

    We need to do a better job of putting ourselves higher on our own ‘to-do’ list.”

    ~Michelle Obama, former First Lady

    Restoring work-life balance some months back in a rooftop igloo during a weekend escape to Nashville

    Coming from two highly driven multi-taskers, work-life balance has been top of mind lately. Tami recently has found herself waking up in the middle of the night with work issues running through her mind. Deb’s been racking up skymiles lately traveling (happily) for work, yet family life pulling at her time and attention while planning her son’s wedding rehearsal dinner party and her mom’s surprise 90th birthday party. Sometimes we both find our lives a little out of balance. In talking about life recently, it gave us pause to think about those living with diabetes…not only is there the need to maintain  equilibrium between work and life, there is the added challenge of managing diabetes.

    What does work-life balance look like?

    That’s the million dollar questions. In short, work-life balance is prioritizing one’s career equally to the demands of personal life. Work-life balance can look different to each person as we each have different life commitments. What tips that balance for you? And what about for the clients/patients that you work with? Work-life balance is a factor to assess and consider in your diabetes care and education encounters.

    It’s said that a good work-life balance has numerous positive effects, including less stress (which could translate into blood glucose spending more time in range with diabetes), a lower risk of general burnout (and diabetes burnout), and a greater sense of well-being. 

    4 tips to help restore balance

    Today we’re sharing 4 tips that you can add to your solution-focused tools and tactics to use with your clients/patients with diabetes (or put into practice yourself) to help restore balance.

    1 – Prioritize your health. It’s easy to put work before health. We both have been guilty of doing so. But working beyond physical and/or mental limits can result in poor work quality and increased health risks. Building on the solution-focused tenet of doing more of what works, prioritizing physical, mental and emotional health can make one a better employee and person. Find a healthy way to get work done without exhausting your body or mind. Prioritizing health can be as simple as fitting in some physical activity or daily meditation.

    2 – Plan personal time. It’s said that achieving work-life balance requires intentional action. A mentor of Tami’s instilled that if you don’t schedule your personal time (such as date night with a spouse, girls/guys night out with friends, or family time) it likely won’t happen. Planning and prioritizing personal time is as important as planning for work. We have to remind ourselves that ultimately we have control of our time and life (at least for the most part, although sometimes we may forget that!).

    3 – Take time to unwind. It’s critical to success. Unplugging from the outside world from time to time allows us to recover from stress and gives us space for other thoughts and ideas to emerge (read some of our past blogs on nature, being with friends, and rest). Unplugging can mean something simple like reading a book for pleasure, binging a new streaming series, or practicing gratitude on your way to and from work, instead of thinking about work. Taking that time to unwind can help prevent burnout and help you feel more energized when at work

    4 – Strive for a realistic balance. Some days, you might focus more on work. Other days you might have more time and energy to spend time with family and friends or enjoy a favorite hobby. Keep the big picture in mind – that balance is achieved over time, not each day.

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published.

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter @AFreshPOVforYou

    Deb is employed by Dexcom, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own.

    Tami is employed by the University of Kentucky HealthCare Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, but her words and opinions in this blog are her own