• Fresh Views

    MINDSET: Today’s word to jump-start solution-focused practice

    Deb’s “office kitty” has a mindset that is always focused on envisioning how to get outside and climb those trees!

    Instead of worrying about what you cannot control, shift your energy to what you can create.― Roy T. Bennett, The Light in the Heart

    Given the chaos, worry, hurry, and stress that COVID-19 has rained upon the world, it’s timely that April is national Stress Awareness month. And who could have guessed several months ago when we slotted the word “Mindset”  as the focus for today’s blog that it would in fact be so relevant. We know you’re all busy and have many things on your mind, so we’re hoping this blog can help everyone take a short stress break and identify opportunities to reduce stress today.

    Today’s word is MINDSET: So what exactly is a Solution-Focused Mindset? 

    In a general sense, “mindset” is the way you think about your world, what you focus on, and how you relate to the world day-to-day. Change, like we’re all  experiencing now, means the emergence of new and challenging problems requiring new solutions. In matters big and small, diabetes-related or not, by embracing a mindset that focuses on solutions, and channeling energy into leveraging strengths and possibilities, you can cultivate a solution-focused mindset. One that envisions success. One which helps manage stress. Focusing on solutions and getting a plan in place helps reduce stress.

    Mindset has a more positive connotation than does stress, and implies that one has some control over the way they interpret and interact with their world during times of increased stress. Today we share with you 7 strategies you can use to help you as you function in your new environment, and also can help you step alongside your clients and support them in embracing a solution-focused mindset and managing stress:

    1. Create a morning mindset routine. We find that starting the day by making a list of each thing you’re looking forward to in that day (or even in the future) creates a feeling of anticipation and excitement that creates momentum for the entire day. Aim for at least 3 things. While you can note them mentally, in your phone’s Notes sections, or in a journal, if you write it them on a post-it note, you can easily post it somewhere that you’ll see it throughout the day (such as on your blood glucose monitoring supplies, on the car dash, on the refrigerator, you get the idea…) By focusing on the positive at the beginning of the day, it’s much easier to be happy, be focused, get work done more quickly. And often,  getting work done seems easier too.
    2. Live your Miracle Day. You may be familiar with the book by Stephen Covey, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. In his book, Habit 2 is called Begin with the end in mind. In thinking about this process, the solution-focused tool The Miracle Question can be employed to change mindset. It guides in envisioning how life would be different tomorrow if a miracle occurred tonight and your challenges were gone. It helps know what you want.You can read more about it and how to use it here. 
    3. Build on your past success(es). While we  might not have any specific past successes that directly relate to our world today, we can apply successes in similar areas. What has worked well for you in the past when you’ve been under stress? Or maybe you can learn from others and what has worked for them. On social media we saw a post about how people are outside taking walks more often while staying and working at home. In one neighborhood someone started writing messages in chalk to give people passing by some hope and strength. We thought this was a great idea and so started doing this too. We now have neighbors writing back to us!
    4. Move your body. It might be simply taking a walk. Physical activity lowers stress hormones and triggers the brain to release chemicals that make you feel better. (We’re finding that taking short walks to clear our minds is helping us to feel less stress and think more clearly). During this time of crisis, many physical activity outlets are offering free online opportunities for those staying at home.
    5. Use positive affirmations. We wrote about using positive affirmations in a blog last December on Healthy Coping here. When life is feeling especially challenging, we’ve found that practicing “daily affirmations” greatly helps us. An affirmation is a short, positive statement that you say to yourself to build yourself up: I can do this. I am strong. Each moment brings choice. I will not hold onto bitterness.I can live an overflowing life. Have you ever tried affirmations? The reality is that we believe what we tell ourselves and what we hear others say about us. Using affirmations can help to “rebuild” negative thinking and strengthen positive thoughts. When working with clients in a solution-focused way, we can  help them to create their own affirmations as one Healthy Coping mechanism.
    6. Surround yourself with positive mindset people. Stress can cause some to turn inward and isolate themselves.Talking to others about your stressors and seeking their support is one way to de-stress. A positive social circle can act as an echo chamber for positive ideas, focusing on a great future and supporting your dreams. Maybe it’s taking a walk outside with a friend (practicing social distancing, of course) or chatting via Google Hangout or Facetime. Whenever the two of us are together we have lots of fun and laughter. That is one way we cope with stress. Find your tribe.
    7. Close out the day with a “wins”checklist. These may be linked to some of the things you were looking forward to, or different things. They don’t have to be monumental. The point is to keep your focus on your day’s best experiences and recognizing how you were able to leverage strengths and doing more of what’s worked well in the past. Finding ways to practice gratitude may be helpful.  You can read more on gratitude here.

    Each week we’ve been inviting readers to participate in a solution-focused challenge. Given all of the real world challenges we are all facing…..we didn’t think you needed another this week! So, we encourage you to try out one or more of the strategies we shared today, and please reach out and let us know how you’re doing! We’d love to help you de-stress and focus on a positive mindset.

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @AFreshPOVforYou

  • Fresh Views

    POSSIBILITIES: Today’s word to jump-start solution-focused practice

    Take your mind off the problems for a moment, and focus on the positive possibilities. Consider how very much you are able to do.  ~ Ralph Marston

    Amidst the COVID-19 crisis our world is facing, and the accompanying anxiety and uncertainty,  we are trying to remind ourselves of the many things big and small that we are grateful for. And one of those is that tomorrow is the first day of spring! The change in seasons brings new beginnings and a fresh start. Buds pop open, as pictured on Deb’s peach tree above. And each of those new buds eventually brings beautiful juicy peaches. So with the arrival of spring, we are reminded that no matter what the situation today, there remain new possibilities for the future.

    We hope you find value and inspiration in our series focusing on words to jump-start solution-focused thinking and conversations. If you’re new to our blog, you can read more about our take on the power of word selection here. Last week’s word was “Strengths” – check out our perspective here.

    Today’s word is POSSIBILITIES

    In solution-focused talk, “possibilities” are interwoven with and build upon “strengths”, and what is working well. In theory, by doing “more” of what is “working”, there’s less time to dwell on things that are not going as well or as desired. Building upon strengths ultimately can create possibilities that you may not have even realized existed!

    In a survey we conducted last year, we asked individuals living with diabetes about their experiences with diabetes education services. As we’ve shared before, many people (71% in our survey) are not satisfied with their experiences. Largely, traditional diabetes care and education services have employed a “problem-focused” approach that concentrates on trying to pin-point causes of “problems”. (What caused your low? Why haven’t you been exercising? What led to your time out of range? You get the idea…) Overwhelmingly, the survey respondents expressed desire for their healthcare professionals (HCPs) to focus on non-judgmental communication with individualized, personalized care and education. The desire is that HCPs be positive and express “You can be healthy and we’re here to support your journey!”  Diabetes care and education specialists can play a key role in stepping alongside their clients with diabetes as think partners to envision possibilities. 

    THIS WEEK’S SOLUTION-FOCUSED CHALLENGE

    Each week we’re including a solution-focused challenge that can help evolve care and education in a solution-focused manner. This week the challenge is to consider conversations around continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The expansion of CGM technologies means more people can have access to more data and use that data to learn much more about their diabetes than what a single number shows. In fact, in the previously mentioned survey, when we asked people what they wanted to be doing “more of” in the future, multiple individuals responded with “more time-in-range.” Of course, no one wants to have glucose values that swing up and down or remain above or below target, yet many conversations (while well-meaning), are often focused on pinpointing the cause of the time out of range and  the “whys”, when the cause is usually “diabetes”

    We’ve interpreted and applied learnings from the recent Advanced Technologies and Treatments for Diabetes meeting (ATTD) and presentation by renowned physician Dr. Rich Bergenstal to illustrate how to review CGM data using a solution-focused approach focused on possibilities and building upon strengths. (You can read the complete summary by diaTribe  here.)

    Here are 5 ways to evolve discussions around CGM:

    1. Flat, Narrow, In-Range (FNIR). When reviewing CGM trends, try using the FNIR approach, aiming for tracings that are flat, narrow, and in-range. It creates a goal and something that is possible with education, management, and support. More importantly, it steers clear of negative or disempowering terms while examining data. 
    2. Steady, Tight And in-Range (STAR). Another approach similar to FNIR, again focusing on possibilities of tracings that are steady, tight, and in-range.
    3. More Green, Less Red (MGLR). Are you familiar with the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP)? An AGP report is a standardized glucose report that includes summary statistics, a glucose profile graph and glucose daily calendar graphs. It provides a report format that is consistent regardless of blood glucose monitoring device. Graphs help translate the numbers into a picture for easy, quick interpretation. Try using MGLR particularly with the bar graph that indicates time-in-range. With this approach focus on the green can draw focus to strengths. What and how did you achieve the amount of green we see on the chart? How can you do more of that to see more green and less red? This approach can help build possibilities and define actions.
    4. Thinking fast and slow. What this means is thinking about readings in real time – when one would need to act fast (like responding to a CGM low alert), then taking some time to look at retrospective data and “think slow”, spending time learning to pinpoint strengths and more realistically think about possibilities.
    5. Best Day. Another solution-focused option that we’re fans of is the “Best Day” pattern feature on the AGP report. Focusing on what went well on the “best day” when their glucose values were more in range can guide the individual to focus on their strengths.  Questions you could ask are, “What were you doing on this day to help you have more green and less red? What else was working for you?” This is also a good opportunity to practice “thinking slow” and encouraging individuals to spend time trying to learn from their CGM data.

    So with the arrival of spring, just as Deb’s peach blossoms have the possibility of turning into sweet, juicy peaches as they did last year (pictured below), taking a solution-focused approach to diabetes care and education can be a fresh new start and bring possibilities to light..

    We welcome anyone interested in our approach to Subscribe to our blog and we’ll email you when a new post is published!

    If you are a health care professional and interested in learning more about our solution-focused practice and approach, when you subscribe to our blog, we’ll send you in return a FREE resource of 10 Solution-Focused Questions to start a solution-focused discussion with your clients. 

    Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @AFreshPOVforYou

  • Fresh Views

    Hello world! A Fresh POV may change your life

    We started our blog in November 2018, just a couple of months ago, and thought we would re-share our first post in the new year for those of you who might not know who we are. Please subscribe to our email list and we’ll let you know when new blogs are published!

    Deb and Tami in Italy enjoying the view!

    Thanks for checking out our new blog “A Fresh POV for You”!  Join us as we focus on Possibilities, Opportunities and creating a Vision (POV) for the future, based on strengths and leveraging positive learnings from past experiences.

    Who are we?

    We are healthcare professionals and diabetes specialists passionate about positivity and empowering people with diabetes to live life to the fullest! Deborah is a nurse. Tami is a dietitian. We both have spent our entire careers partnering with those living with diabetes to leave a positive imprint.

    We are also speakers, authors, wives, moms, adventurers, and avid travelers always in search of the next fresh and magnificent view. (You see one of those stunning views in this photo, looking out over a vineyard in Italy). You’ll learn more about us and some of our adventures over time.

    What is our focus?

    Simply put, our goal is to inspire those living with diabetes, or at risk for diabetes to design a life that has a personal sense of balance, is realistic and fun. A life that works for them. It goes without saying that managing diabetes is complex and burdensome. The constant focus on problems can make it even harder. We are passionate about turning the focus to abilities and possibilities. What will be different and new instead of what will NOT happen anymore?  What is desired instead of what is NOT wanted? Let’s learn from each other!  

    Why did we start this blog?

    Since November is Diabetes Awareness month there’s no better time than now to let you in on our new adventure in diabetes that’s been in the works behind the scenes for some time.  

    Getting to know us personally, beyond professionally is important. We believe in the concept of a “therapeutic alliance”- which means that the relationship between health care professionals and people with diabetes is the most important component.  

    Awhile back, we discovered an approach called Solutions Focused Brief Therapy. It resonated with us because of the focus on possibilities, opportunities, and creating a vision for the future.  How about applying this to diabetes?  We  look forward to sharing with you as we learn more!

    Then we joined together to craft content for two recently released brief videos focusing on the use of empowering language in diabetes. Language that puts the person with diabetes, their needs and their values first, thus moving away from language that judges, blames and shames. These videos are based on the language position paper published by the American Diabetes Association and American Association of Diabetes Educators. (You can check out the paper and the videos here and on our blog homepage). Over the months that we worked on the video project we had many soul searching discussions about how diabetes care and education needs to evolve and innovate.

    And thus was born A Fresh POV for You! If you are someone who feels challenged and overwhelmed with aspects of life with diabetes – or someone who just wants to learn more about our creative approach – follow our blog as we begin to share more about our exciting new adventure over the next few months. We have lots of creative ideas and ways we hope to engage in innovative diabetes services! Our goal is to create programs and services that resonate and make sense for people living with diabetes.

    Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @AFreshPOVforYou.  

  • Fresh Views

    Sometimes it’s Challenging to find a Fresh POV!

    Day time orange sun with thick smoke in the sky

    While our focus is “fresh views”, today there is nothing “fresh” about the air in northern California or the views in the sky. The devastating Camp Fire in Paradise, CA is beyond words. We felt compelled to share our thoughts since this fire is so close to home for @DebGreenwood.

    How can survivors of this fire living with diabetes or other chronic conditions even think about their next steps (never mind taking medication or counting carbohydrates)?  The Apple Watch is a reminder every day that the air quality is unhealthy for all, and certainly not suitable for outdoor exercise. So we began to ponder, how can solutions focused brief therapy (SFBT) help those who find themselves in this situation and devastation to move one small step forward, and create hope and possibilities? Admittedly, this is really challenging and we’re struggling to find a way to think through this problem.

    SFBT is all about asking questions and helping a person recognize their strengths. A recent blog post by Dr. Anne Bodmer Lutz, A Language of Hope: Top 10 Solution Focused Translations, helps us think about opportunities to support individuals to be future-focused when faced with challenges.

    So, one question might be “Who are the most important people in your life and what do you most appreciate about them?” The answer may help one recognize that he or she has a support system around them, and that these important individuals can be a source of strength.

    A second question may be “What do you know?” This question focuses on competence. For instance, for a parent of a child with diabetes living under a stressful situation, one might ask, “What do you know about your child that tells you he is going to be okay?”

    Another question is the “indirect compliment” where one asks “How did you do it? Or “How did you manage to remember to take your insulin?”  By recognizing what has been accomplished and past success, one can feel a sense of empowerment.

    One thing learned from Dr. Anne Bodmer Lutz is that “cope” is just one letter away from “hope”.

    Those of us at A Fresh POV for You are wishing everyone impacted by these California wildfires all of the possibilities and opportunities for your future.

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